Mattress and bedding: layering your nest
Pickleball invasion!

"Belts," "harnesses" and stigma

To obtain reimbursement for soft postural supports, they have to fit within language that insurance companies, Medicare and Medicaid expect, and that clinicians prescribing these will use.  Thus, BP uses terms like "hip belt," "calf strap" and "shoulder harness."

The problem with these names is that they sound like a restraint, limiting freedom of movement.

Our list of common postural myths highlights that stabilizing your position doesn't restrain or prevent movement -- quite the contrary. With a more stable upper body, core and/or lower body (whichever parts need stabilizing), the rest of your body has more freedom to move in safety and comfort. And that's equally true whether you're playing wheelchair tennis, bouncing around on a city bus or reaching for a can of peaches.

By the way,  the "safety" that our standards-tested products provide isn't just about not falling out of a chair -- it means less sacral sitting that can lead to pressure ulcers; reduced skin chafing from heat, rough webbing or edge stitching; less bruising from heavy inserts or unforgiving pads; less chance of injury in a collision or chair malfunction, and more.  We have seen real-world examples of each, all worth avoiding.

So when you get past the scary labels, BP's standards-tested products offer all-day assistance with the activities you need and want to do. Let us know how we can help!

 

 

 

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